The Ministry of Other Smaller Ministries
(via Photographer Recreates Iconic Photos With John Malkovich As The Main Subject | DeMilked)

jtotheizzoe:

Emma Watson: Accio Equality!

You really need to watch Emma Watson’s brilliant and moving speech from the floor of the United Nations, as part of the UN HeForShe campaign, on the importance of feminism and the right of every human, regardless of gender, to become the most complete version of themselves. It’s not science, but it’s more important than anything I could possibly share with you today.

She offers a formal invitation to the men of the world to join in the efforts for worldwide gender equality.

To Emma: Invitation accepted.

Are you with us?

50thousand:

Daily Show correspondent Michael Che tries to find a safe place to report from.


Anonymous Explains TLoK Ending

I’m not sure what that tear is supposed to mean exactly, but I’m pretty damn sure it’s not this.
1. This isn’t Korra’s reaction to Tenzin’s words. Actually, her reaction to them (and when Meelo jumped onto her wheelchair) was the closest she was to smiling after the battle. This tear comes later, after Jinora’s anointment.
2. This is completely ignoring the entire Korra’s growth and treating her like the person we’ve seen in the very first episode. For the whole series Korra was building her identity to be much more than just the Avatar. Through her personal relationships and even through being a pro-bending player. Culminating in the 2nd season’s finale when Tenzin told her “let go your attachment to who you think you are and connect to your inner spirit”, the rest of the conversation in the Tree of Time (“he wasn’t define by Raava anymore that you are”) and when, after accepting this and connecting to the Cosmic Energy, she defeated Vatuu/Unalaq while not being the Avatar, by herself (well, with Jinora’s help).
3. We’ve seen in this season that she was able to find a role for her as the Avatar in the world her actions redefined - by rebuilding the Air Nation. And in the world thrown into turmoil by Red Lotus and still by the massive change that was merging with the Spirit World there are plenty of things for her to do, even with a few dozens of half-baked Air Nomads trying their best to help her.
4. After all that she should now be smart enough to understand that inspiring the new nation of people, that she even helped to establish, to try to maintain peace and balance to their best abilities is exactly what fulfilling her role as the Avatar should be.

Anonymous Explains TLoK Ending

I’m not sure what that tear is supposed to mean exactly, but I’m pretty damn sure it’s not this.

1. This isn’t Korra’s reaction to Tenzin’s words. Actually, her reaction to them (and when Meelo jumped onto her wheelchair) was the closest she was to smiling after the battle. This tear comes later, after Jinora’s anointment.

2. This is completely ignoring the entire Korra’s growth and treating her like the person we’ve seen in the very first episode. For the whole series Korra was building her identity to be much more than just the Avatar. Through her personal relationships and even through being a pro-bending player. Culminating in the 2nd season’s finale when Tenzin told her “let go your attachment to who you think you are and connect to your inner spirit”, the rest of the conversation in the Tree of Time (“he wasn’t define by Raava anymore that you are”) and when, after accepting this and connecting to the Cosmic Energy, she defeated Vatuu/Unalaq while not being the Avatar, by herself (well, with Jinora’s help).

3. We’ve seen in this season that she was able to find a role for her as the Avatar in the world her actions redefined - by rebuilding the Air Nation. And in the world thrown into turmoil by Red Lotus and still by the massive change that was merging with the Spirit World there are plenty of things for her to do, even with a few dozens of half-baked Air Nomads trying their best to help her.

4. After all that she should now be smart enough to understand that inspiring the new nation of people, that she even helped to establish, to try to maintain peace and balance to their best abilities is exactly what fulfilling her role as the Avatar should be.

24,685 plays

imjusthereforkainora:

Korra Week Day 1: Alone

There’s been a lot of talk lately about how Korra has PTSD and how alone she must feel but then I remembered that no one is ever really alone. There are those watching over you even though you may not see them.

also i originally wasn’t gonna do a korra week thing but it literally just happened that i finished this today and it fit the theme so yay me

(via Asami redux by Artipelago on deviantART)
First space selfie - Buzz Aldrin during Gemini 12 in 1966

First space selfie - Buzz Aldrin during Gemini 12 in 1966

"In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit."

"In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit."

British ships lost during the Second World War

British ships lost during the Second World War

The Heihe–Tengchong Line (simplified Chinese: 黑河-腾沖线; traditional Chinese: 黑河-騰衝線; pinyin: Hēihé-Téngchōng xiàn), also called the Aihui-Tengchong Line, is an imaginary line that divides the area of China into two roughly equal parts. It stretches from the city of Heihe to Tengchong County, diagonally across China.

Chinese population geographer Hu Huanyong imagined the line in 1935 and called it a “geo-demographic demarcation line”.

This imaginary line divides the territory of China as follows (going by 1935 statistics):

West of the line: 57% of the area, but only 4% of the population (1935)
East of the line: 43% of the area, but 96% of the population (1935)
According to 2002 statistics they are as follows:

West of the line: 57% of the area, but only 6% of the population (2002)
East of the line: 43% of the area, but 94% of the population (2002)
Although more than 70 years have passed since 1935, the modern statistics remain very close to the original numbers. The territory has not changed but the population has slightly shifted from east to west.

The slight change in population is attributed to Han Chinese migration to urban areas in autonomous regions of Tibet and Xinjiang. However, the west side of the Heihe–Tengchong Line still remains relatively rural and poor as compared to the east.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heihe%E2%80%93Tengchong_Line

The Heihe–Tengchong Line (simplified Chinese: 黑河-腾沖线; traditional Chinese: 黑河-騰衝線; pinyin: Hēihé-Téngchōng xiàn), also called the Aihui-Tengchong Line, is an imaginary line that divides the area of China into two roughly equal parts. It stretches from the city of Heihe to Tengchong County, diagonally across China.

Chinese population geographer Hu Huanyong imagined the line in 1935 and called it a “geo-demographic demarcation line”.

This imaginary line divides the territory of China as follows (going by 1935 statistics):

West of the line: 57% of the area, but only 4% of the population (1935)
East of the line: 43% of the area, but 96% of the population (1935)
According to 2002 statistics they are as follows:

West of the line: 57% of the area, but only 6% of the population (2002)
East of the line: 43% of the area, but 94% of the population (2002)
Although more than 70 years have passed since 1935, the modern statistics remain very close to the original numbers. The territory has not changed but the population has slightly shifted from east to west.

The slight change in population is attributed to Han Chinese migration to urban areas in autonomous regions of Tibet and Xinjiang. However, the west side of the Heihe–Tengchong Line still remains relatively rural and poor as compared to the east.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heihe%E2%80%93Tengchong_Line

The heaps of whale bones on the beach is estimated to contain the remains of 550 beluga whales. These bones and the nearby boats are designated as cultural remains and as such are protected and may not be touched or removed. (via Piles of Beluga Whale Bones at Abandoned Whaling Station in Svalbard | Amusing Planet)

The heaps of whale bones on the beach is estimated to contain the remains of 550 beluga whales. These bones and the nearby boats are designated as cultural remains and as such are protected and may not be touched or removed. (via Piles of Beluga Whale Bones at Abandoned Whaling Station in Svalbard | Amusing Planet)